The bar’s best friend . . .

. . . is surely Abbott Laboratories, which has, by imPaneled’s estimation, entangled itself in more complex litigation and government investigations than any other titan of corporate America over the last 20 years.  What would motivate such a scurrilous assertion, you say?  Well, imPaneled decided to end its most recent hiatus by reporting on the most recent Panel proceeding to hit the dockets, whatever that might have been.  And, lo and behold, it was filed by imPaneled’s old friend Abbott, the primary offender–make that alleged offender–in MDL 2460, In re Niaspan Antitrust Litigation, a pay-for-delay proceeding now pending in the East Coast district court nearest you.  Abbott first appeared on imPaneled’s radar long before “blog” was a word, as the primary offender in In re Infant Formula Antitrust Litig. (N.D. Fla. circa 1993).

Abbott has since kept the wheels of justice turning with multiple violations.  imPaneled’s hurried Lexis search turned up only four, but memories of having seen others are seared–seared!–in imPaneled’s mind.  But the four alone make for quite a record.  The quotes below are unattributed, but imPaneled is so trustworthy as to not require citations:

2012: “Abbott signed the $1.6-billion settlement agreement in May 2012 to resolve all outstanding issues regarding the investigation of past sales and marketing practices relating to Depakote in the US.”

2008: “Abbott Laboratories To Pay $184 Million To Settle Fenofibrate Lawsuits.”

2003: “This settlement resolves all outstanding issues arising from the previously disclosed government investigation of the Ross Products Division for which Abbott took a charge of $622 million in the second quarter and announced on June 26.”

2001: “Abbott Laboratories announced that its reserves are adequate to cover its half of the costs related to the $875 million settlement announced between the U.S. Department of Justice and TAP Pharmaceutical Products Inc., a joint venture of Abbott and Takeda Chemical Industries, Ltd. of Osaka, Japan.”

Rumors that Abbott has a Malfeasance Management Division are unfounded.  imPaneled thanks Abbott in advance for whatever further contributions to attorneys’ retirement funds will be forthcoming as a result of MDL 2460.

 

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  • About the blogmaster

    Bart Cohen is the principal of the Law Office of Bart D. Cohen, where he represents his clients in class actions and other complex litigation, and Winning Briefs, where he polishes, edits and drafts written work product for overextended lawyers.

    His unnatural appetites for rules and research of all kinds have made him an expert on proceedings before the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation. He feeds those appetites and chronicles the battles to land lead counsel appointments that are fought in part before the Panel on imPaneled.

    You can contact Bart here or connect with him here.

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